Things to do in Penn State: September 2-9

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New York artist Rosemarie Fiore will perform her smoke painting on September 9 at 2 p.m. on the HUB-Robeson lawn of the University Park campus. Image: courtesy of the artist

What’s going on at Penn State? Here’s a look at some of the cultural events – both in-person and virtual – taking place at the University this weekend and next week:

Performances

Rosemarie Fiore – 2 p.m., September 9, HUB-Robeson Lawn, University Park campus. New York artist Rosemarie Fiore will perform her smoke painting. To free.

Events

Transport fair – 12:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m., September 3, HUB-Robeson Lawn, University Park Campus. Transportation departments and partner organizations will be invited to share information on campus parking, biking, transit, bus and shuttle services, carpooling and carpooling, and vehicle rentals Penn State Fleet . Participants will be offered free food and can win prizes. To free.

LION Feast – 5-8 p.m., September 9, Allen Street Gates, State College. The annual Living In One Neighborhood, or LION Bash is an annual neighborhood party designed to foster a sense of community among longtime residents and students of State College Borough. The event will feature food, music and fun for residents of all ages. To free.

Conferences

PSU Press presents: “Perspectives on sensory history” – 4 p.m., September 2, via Zoom. Four authors of new and recent books on sensory history will participate in a discussion moderated by Kendra Boileau, associate director and editor-in-chief of Penn State Press. Free, but registration required.

Smith Creative Writers Reading Series: Marie-Hélène Bertino – 6 p.m., September 2, via Zoom. New York Times Editor’s Choice novelist Marie-Hélène Bertino will launch Penn State Behrend’s fall semester series. To free.

Mary E. Rolling Reading Series: James Charlesworth and Leah Huizar – 7:30 p.m., September 9, Foster Auditorium, Paterno Library, University Park campus and via livestream. Novelist James Charlesworth and poet Leah Huizar launch the Mary E. Rolling Fall Reading Series. To free.

Smith Creative Writers Reading Series: Amy Hempel – 6 p.m., September 9 via Zoom. Penn State Behrend presents Amy Hempel, author of five collections of stories, including “Sing to It,” published in 2019. Free.

Virtual exhibitions

“African brilliance and the purpose of art” – This interactive virtual tour accompanied the Palmer Museum of Art’s special Spring 2020 exhibition “African Brilliance: A Diplomat’s Sixty Years of Collection” and will remain available throughout the current academic year. Explore the exhibition installation, images of selected works, videos for a guided tour and suggestions for related artistic activities. To free.

“Celebrating the ADA: The Legacy and Evolution of Disability Rights and Lived Experiences at Penn State” – The University Libraries Virtual Exhibit explores the first 100 years of national disability rights law and the movement’s impact on the Penn State community. To free.

“Global Asians: Contemporary Asian and American Art of Asian Origin from the Collections of Jordan D. Schnitzer and His Family Foundations” – This interactive web-based program from the Palmer Museum of Art offers guided video tours of selected artists of the exhibition in addition to an introductory overview by the curator. Discover the concept of personal and cultural identity of “Global Asians” in a contemporary world. The featured artists are: Jacob Hashimoto, Dinh Q. Lê, Hung Liu, Takashi Murakami, Roger Shimomura, Do Ho Suh and Rirkrit Tiranvanija. To free.

“Pandemic spaces (1918 Edition)” – Virtual University Library Display explores how architecture relates to the devastating flu epidemic of 1918. Free.

“Who am I? Art and Identity” – This self-directed and interactive online tour presents a selection of objects from various areas of the Palmer Museum of Art’s collection, linked through a common exploration of personal or cultural identity. To free.

“Women in art: Activism + Resistance” – This self-directed, interactive online tour of the Palmer Museum of Art is intended for college-level courses and features a selection of objects by female artists in the museum’s collection. To celebrate the centenary of the 19th Amendment, this tour highlights artists working in various mediums during the 20th and 21st centuries who have contributed to political, social and cultural change. To free.

In person exhibitions

“Private domain” – Until October 8, McLanahan Gallery, Misciagna Family Center for the Performing Arts, Penn State Altoona. “Private Domain” is a series of narrative paintings that blend the symbolism of mythology and alchemy. In recent years, this series has gained in complexity to push the viewer to question what is revealed and what is hidden in the work, allowing him to conclude multiple interpretations from the visual transformations within the work. artwork. To free.

Nishiki Sugawara-Beda – Until October 8, McLanahan Gallery, Misciagna Family Center for the Performing Arts, Penn State Altoona. Sugawar-Beda’s work is inspired and established by Japanese calligraphy, which served as a gateway for him to understand his culture and the deeper meanings of existence. Through her work, she encourages the viewer to connect with themselves on a deeper level. To free.

“Spirits of the wind” – Until November 20, Art Alley, HUB-Robeson Galleries, University Park campus. Wind Spirits ”is an exhibition by artists Tatiana Arocha, Deirdre Murphy and Rachel Sydlowski, considering the power and delicacy of Earth’s avian creatures and the broader implications that duality poses for human roles in the natural world. To free.

“Ukiyo-e: Images of the floating world, Japanese prints from the permanent collection” – Until December 5, Palmer Museum of Art, University Park campus. The art of ukiyo-e flourished in Japan during the Edo period (1615-1867). Period artists specializing in genre scenes, portraits of actors and courtesans, and later landscape, in a way that reflected the most contemporary fashions and attitudes, their work became known as ukiyo-e, or “floating world images”. To free.

“Blackout Poetry” – Until December 10, Campus Library, Penn State Fayette. “Blackout Poetry” is a creative way to bring new meaning to any written text and to personalize it. Write words to create a unique piece. All entries will be posted in the campus library. To free.

“Patchwork Voices Community Collection” – Through December 10, Coal and Coke Heritage Center, Campus Library, Penn State Fayette. The Patchwork Voices Community Collection is one of the Coal and Coke Heritage Center’s untreated collections. Unprocessed means that a traditional finding aid was not created to allow researchers to access the documents. The collection consists of small family collections. Visitors will find materials such as photographs, letters, recipes, mining certificates, newspapers, magazines, union materials, clothing and mining tools. To free.

“Righting a mistake: Japanese Americans and World War II” – Until December 10, campus library, Penn State Fayette. The exhibit examines the complicated history and impact of Executive Order 9066 that led to the incarceration of Japanese Americans following the attack on Pearl Harbor. To free.

“Tree Celebration” – Until December 12, Henry Gallery, Penn State Great Valley. The presentation hosts photographs, prints, paintings and multimedia works. All artists are inspired by the architecture of the trees themselves, formative memories, the experience of being in nature and environmentalism. To support improved environmental policies and draw attention to climate change, they demonstrate a connection to the land and an understanding of the importance of forests. To free.

“Global Asians: Contemporary Asian and American Art of Asian Origin from the Collections of Jordan D. Schnitzer and His Family Foundation” – Until December 12, Palmer Museum of Art, University Park campus. This interactive web-based program offers guided video tours of selected exhibition artists in addition to an introductory overview by the curator. Discover the concept of personal and cultural identity of “Global Asians” in a contemporary world. To free.

“Place to Place: Recent Donations of American Drawings and Watercolors, 1900-1950” – Until December 12, Palmer Museum of Art, University Park campus. “Place to Place” offers a getaway across America in the first half of the 20th century. From New York to New Mexico via New Orleans, a range of sites in several different media are brought together to explore the notions of place. International regions represented include Belgium, England, France, Germany and Morocco. To free.

“Documenting the moment: a visual journal” – Until December 31, Ronald K. DeLong Gallery, Penn State Lehigh Valley. The exhibition features a collection of ink and graphite drawings by artist Jason Travers that capture what he sees in real time at a particular moment. To free.

“Lost bird project” – Until January 26, 2022, exhibition windows, HUB-Robeson Galleries, University Park campus. “Lost Bird Project” consists of five sculptural monuments dedicated to extinct bird species. Designed by artist Todd McGrain, the “Lost Bird Project” recognizes the tragedy of modern extinction by immortalizing the five most recently extinct North American birds. To free.

“Why biodiversity is important” – Until January 26, 2022, exhibition windows, HUB-Robeson Galleries, University Park campus. “Why Biodiversity Matters” includes avian research and educational materials from the Shaver’s Creek Environmental Center and Penn State’s Wildlife and Fisheries Program. To free.

“Altar” – Until January 30, 2022, exhibition windows, HUB-Robeson Galleries, University Park campus. Kiana Honarmand’s installation in the showcases of the exhibition uses text from Iranian feminist poet Forough Farrokhzad’s poem “Gift” to pay homage to the history of the concealment of critical commentary in Persian poetry and visual arts.

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