Rigg Design Prize 2022 winner voices Australia’s need for blood donation

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Can creativity make you bleed? That’s the question posed by a blood donation campaign that recently won the Rigg Design Prize, Australia’s highest national honor for contemporary design, organized by the National Gallery of Victoria. The communication design led by Leo Burnett Australia ponders a simple idea: what emotion could be strong enough to inspire people to come out and take action? “We use different emotional drivers like fear, sadness, joy, disgust,” shares Andy Fergusson, National Executive Creative Director, Leo Burnett Australia, of the concept which won a $30,000 cash prize. “Each element of the campaign,” Fergusson continues, “uses an engine to hopefully inspire and motivate people, and then we ask people to vote for the one that best suits them.”




The presentation, Can Creativity Make You Bleed?, by Leo Burnett Australia Image: Tobias Titz





Concept video by Leo Burnett Australia Video: Courtesy of Leo Burnett Australia


Leo Burnett’s entry won the esteemed three-year prize, having been selected from a range of concepts submitted by seven other participating studios. The 2022 Rigg Design Prize was looking for “campaigns that articulated the potential of creativity to accelerate positive social, cultural, economic or environmental change”. Eight Australian-based creative agencies – TBWAMelbourne, The Royals, DDB Group Melbourne, Frost*collective, Thinkerbell, Clemenger BBDO Melbourne, Gilimbaa and Leo Burnett Australia – have been invited by the NGV to compete for the award.

Each studio was asked to prepare a suite of line items featuring an intriguing idea tied to the power of creativity. Using their expertise in graphic design, typography, digital media, film, psychology and creative writing, the studios came up with a distinguished array of concepts, serving as a call to action for the Australian community. Nurturing unique messages – billboards, street posters and moving images celebrated how creativity can shape who we are and the world we live in. The concept of DDB Group Melbourne The creative index presented data that tracked creativity for the first time in the Australian equity market. The Royals have designed a speculative online store called Without store selling hypothetical versions of some of society’s best-known inventions, all born of Australian creativity. Thinkerbell’s Priceless scraper reinvented the popular scratch card by replacing the prize’s dollar value with “creativity” – a prize that the Sydney and Melbourne-based studio says is impossible to put a price tag on. Similarly, other campaigns include using a common open-ended question to prompt possible solutions to current problems (Ideas?, Frost*Collective), a reconnection to creativity to better understand the past of the Australian nation (Unlearn the truthsGilimbaa), and a series of graphic ephemera communicating that creativity, when applied to financial matters, can change trajectories (Everything grows with creativityTBWAMelbourne).

The featured campaigns have now been brought together in the form of an exhibition which is on display at the Ian Potter Centre: NGV Australia in Melbourne.



Leo Burnett's campaign tests the power of creativity to evoke emotion and motivate action |  CNG |  melbourne |  STIRworld
Leo Burnett’s campaign tests the power of creativity to evoke emotion and motivate action Image: Tobias Titz


Leo Burnett’s winning campaign highlights the Australian community’s need for blood donation. Speaking of the concept, Fergusson explains: “We came back to a quote from Leo Burnett. He said that creativity has the power to transform human behavior. This is an opportunity for us to not only talk about creative potential, but also to prove that creativity has the potential to motivate people and create tangible results. Our creative concept is “Can Creativity Make You Bleed?” and what we do is we put creative potential to the test by finding out what emotion is going to motivate people to donate blood.”




A conversation with Leo Burnett Australia discussing their campaign Video: Courtesy of the Rigg Design Prize


He continues: “Donating blood is one of those basic human needs that has existed since the dawn of time. It’s also something that’s really hard for people to do. They fail to realize it, many people are afraid of it. Only three percent of Australians actually donate blood.



  • The campaign is activated by a QR code |  CNG |  melbourne |  STIRworld
    The campaign is activated by a QR code Image: Tobias Titz






  • Using intriguing visualizations, the campaign encourages the Australian community to donate blood |  CNG |  melbourne |  STIRworld
    Using intriguing visualizations, the campaign encourages the Australian community to donate blood Image: Tom Ross






  • The campaign and its graphic ephemera are praised for their original idea and their capacity for impact, by the jury of the prize |  CNG |  melbourne |  STIRworld
    The campaign and its graphic ephemera are praised for their original idea and their capacity for impact, by the jury of the prize Image: Tom Ross



The campaign, which is activated by a QR code, records and displays results on a live graph, showcasing visualizations that elicit emotions. The design award jury includes Beatrice Galilee, co-founder and executive director of The World Around; Ewan McEoin, Senior Curator of Contemporary Art, Design and Architecture, NGV; and Morry Schwartz, founder of Schwartz Media, who all appreciated the design’s clear strategic approach, compelling idea and ability to impact. They also praised the American advertising company’s use of language, image and installation to the best of its abilities, in addition to demonstrating exceptional craftsmanship in revealing how the strengths Advertising creative can be powerful.

Promoting the legacy of the late Colin Rigg (1895-1982), former secretary of the NGV’s Felton Legacy Committee, the Rigg Design Prize was established in 1994 to recognize contemporary design practice in Victoria. Presenting their ninth edition, the eight campaigns of the triennial prize remain on display until January 29, 2023.

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